Healthcare and insurance in Pa. | The Numbers Racket

CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 22: Demonstrators protest changes to the Affordable Care Act on June 22, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. Senate Republican's unveiled their revised health-care bill in Washington today, after fine tuning it in behind closed doors. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

There’s no doubt that healthcare and insurance are at, or near the top of the list of voters’ concerns this election year

To better understand what the health insurance and healthcare picture looks like for Pennsylvanians, let’s look at 2019 data from the Pennsylvania State Data Center.

Here’s the breakdown: 

As of 2018, 94.5 percent of Pennsylvanians had health insurance. 

57.1% … the percentage of Pennsylvanians with private insurance. 

22.1% … the percentage of Pennsylvanians with public insurance. 

15.3% … the percentage of Pennsylvanians with both. 

5.5.% …  the percentage of Pennsylvanians with no health insurance. 

Of the uninsured …

5% were under the age of 18.

10.4% were between the ages of 18-64.

4.4% were 65 and older. 

Healthcare statistics

The birth rate in Pennsylvania is 10.8 births per 1,000 individuals.

The mortality rate in Pennsylvania is 10.6 deaths per 1,000 individuals.

There is 1 primary care doctor to every 1,234 Pennsylvanians. 

There’s 1 dentist to every 1,458 Pennsylvanians. 

There’s 1 mental health specialist to every 526 Pennsylvanians. 

Healthcare and social assistance are the largest industries in Pennsylvania, employing 1,068,610 people, according to the Pennsylvania Data Center. 

Cassie Miller
A native Pennsylvanian, Cassie Miller worked for various publications across the Midstate before joining the team at the Pennsylvania Capital-Star. In her previous roles, she has covered everything from local sports to the financial services industry. Miller has an extensive background in magazine writing, editing and design. She is a graduate of Penn State University where she served as the campus newspaper’s photo editor. She is currently pursuing her master’s degree in professional journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. In addition to her role at the Capital-Star, Miller enjoys working on her independent zines, Dead Air and Infrared.