Report: The most and least equitable schools in Pa. | The Numbers Racket

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The gap between the rich and poor have been exacerbated by the global COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, one of the areas where those discrepancies is most prevalent is in education

An August study from WalletHub, a financial news website, found that Pennsylvania has the 24th least equitable school districts in the U.S.

Methodology

WalletHub based its rankings of school districts throughout the country on two metrics: 

  • Average household income
  • Expenditures for public elementary and secondary schools per pupil

WalletHub acquired this data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Center for Education Statistics.

The districts are ranked based on the total score of each district with the lowest value representing the most equitable. 

Source: WalletHub

 

Top 10 Most Equitable Schools in Pa.: 

  1. Trinity Area School District
  2. Big Spring School District
  3. Catasauqua School District
  4. Central York School District
  5. Leechburg Area School District
  6. Canon Mcmillan School District
  7. Jefferson-Morgan School District
  8. Westmont Hilltop School District
  9. Wilson Area School District
  10. Littletown Area School District 

The 10 Least Equitable Schools in Pa.: 

  1. Lower Merion School District
  2. New Hope Solebury School District
  3. Tredyffrin-Easttown School District
  4. Radnor Township School District
  5. Upper Dublin School District 
  6. Unionville Chadds Ford School District
  7. Council Rock School District
  8. Upper St. Clair Township School District
  9. Great Valley School District
  10. Garnet Valley School District

Can’t find your school? You can check out the complete list with all 499 school districts ranked here.

Cassie Miller
A native Pennsylvanian, Cassie Miller worked for various publications across the Midstate before joining the team at the Pennsylvania Capital-Star. In her previous roles, she has covered everything from local sports to the financial services industry. Miller has an extensive background in magazine writing, editing and design. She is a graduate of Penn State University where she served as the campus newspaper’s photo editor. She is currently pursuing her master’s degree in professional journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. In addition to her role at the Capital-Star, Miller enjoys working on her independent zines, Dead Air and Infrared.