Cocaine, marijuana and heroin topped fourth quarter drug seizures | The Numbers Racket

A Pennsylvania State Police Ford Interceptor (Raymond Wambsgans/Flickr)

This week, The Pennsylvania State Police released their drug seizure totals for the fourth quarter of 2019.  The numbers included the confiscation of illegal drugs from highways and communities across the state.

Check out this week’s Number’s Racket:

2019 Totals

300 … pounds of heroin and fentanyl seized.

830 … pounds of prescription drugs and medication collected in the drug take-back program

43 million …. Dollars’ worth of illegal drugs confiscated by state police.

The Breakdown by total pounds seized

  1. Processed Marijuana – 1,016.44 lbs.
  2. Methamphetamines – 81.92 lbs.
  3. Cocaine – 79.54 lbs.

The Breakdown by total value of amount seized

  1. Processed Marijuana – $3,049,320
  2. Cocaine – $1,749,880
  3. Heroin – $1,476,960

Total Value seized in 2019: $8.7 million.

Narcotics

The Pennsylvania State police seized more than 9 lbs. of narcotics in 2019. The value of pills and other narcotics is estimated at $161,205.

That’s 36,976 pills!

Marijuana

While the lawmakers argue over whether Pennsylvania should eventually legalize recreational cannabis,, state troopers stayed busy. They seized 101 marijuana plants in 2019.

They also seized 26.93 pints of liquid marijuana, THC, and 54.9 lbs. of solid marijuana THC.

Outliers

Among the trooper’s confiscations were 286 doses of LSD valued at $5,720; 197 MDMA pills and nearly $11,000 worth of ecstasy.

The good news

  • The by-dollar total of confiscated illegal drugs was down this year from $66 million.
  • Heroin and fentanyl confiscation fell by 103 lbs. in 2019.
  • There are 65 drug take-back boxes at state police stations across the state.

 

A native Pennsylvanian, Cassie Miller worked for various publications across the Midstate before joining the team at the Pennsylvania Capital-Star. In her previous roles, she has covered everything from local sports to the financial services industry. Miller has an extensive background in magazine writing, editing and design. She is a graduate of Penn State University where she served as the campus newspaper’s photo editor. She is currently pursuing her master’s degree in professional journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. In addition to her role at the Capital-Star, Miller enjoys working on her independent zines, Dead Air and Infrared.