Gov. Tom Wolf tests positive for COVID-19

This breaking story will be updated. 

Gov. Tom Wolf has tested positive for COVID-19.

Wolf, 72, said in a statement released Wednesday afternoon that he tested positive Tuesday afternoon during a routine test, and is now quarantining at his home in York County with no symptoms.

“I am continuing to serve the commonwealth and performing all of my duties remotely, as many are doing during the pandemic,” Wolf, a Democrat, said in the statement.

The statement did not say where he may have been exposed. First Lady Frances Wolf’s COVID test results are still pending.

Wolf’s diagnosis comes the same week that the General Assembly confirmed its 9th case of COVID-19 when state Rep. Mike Reese, R-Westmoreland, announced his positive test result via Facebook.

Pa. Rep. Reese tests positive for COVID-19, tenth Pa. lawmaker to announce case

At least four other governors have tested positive for COVID-19. That includes three in the last month amid a late year surge in cases across the country. The chief executives who have tested positive include Colorado Gov. Jared Polis, Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak, and Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon.

Pennsylvania has seen a dramatic increase in cases in recent weeks. The state is now averaging more than 9,000 new cases a day after averaging just more than 900 a day in late September.

Wolf last appeared publicly during a virtual press conference on Monday, when he noted the rise in cases and asked Pennsylvanians, once again, to wear a mask and stay inside to prevent a surge in cases from overwhelming hospitals.

Wolf says he’ll decide on new COVID mitigation in next few days, asks for citizens to stay home

He also hinted at announcing new COVID-19 restrictions later in the week, which was reinforced by media reports Wednesday night. How Wolf’s diagnosis will impact the timeline for new public health rules is unclear.

But Wolf used his diagnosis to remind Pennsylvanians to take the pandemic seriously and that “no one is immune from COVID.”

“Following all precautions as I have done is not a guarantee, but it is what we know to be vital to stopping the spread of the disease and so I ask all Pennsylvanians to wear a mask, stay home as much as possible, socially distance yourself from those not in your household, and, most of all, take care of each other and stay safe,” Wolf said.