Living on a prayer? Jon Bon Jovi sent out a fundraising email for Cory Booker’s ailing campaign | Monday Morning Coffee

Jon Bon Jovi (Image via Flickr Commons)

Good Monday Morning, Fellow Seekers.

With one of the nation’s largest and, perhaps, best-paid legislatures on hiatus until Oct. 21 for some reason, we’re turning our attention to the national stage this morning. Specifically, to New Jersey, where we find one of the Garden State’s favorite sons (who isn’t named Sprmrhuce Shmpringsteen) dipping a toe into the 2020 presidential waters.

In a fundraising blast on Saturday, rocker Jon Bon Jovi went to bat for U.S. Sen. Cory Booker’s presidential campaign, which, it can be fairly said, isn’t exactly … a bed of roses these days.

The New Jersey senator is polling at a scant 1.5 percent, according to the Real Clear Politics average. And he’s been struggling to raise the money needed to keep his campaign going.

Enter Bon Jovi, who had nothing but praise for Booker and his commitment to his home state.

The Garden State lawmaker “is a great man who would do an amazing job in the White House. I’m lucky to call him a friend, and all of us would be lucky to call him our president,” Bon Jovi wrote.

Given the nation’s fractious state, and the looming fight over impeachment, the rocker went on to add that, “I believe we need to respond with a strong call for unity and a renewed sense of shared purpose. I can’t think of anyone better than Cory Booker to rise to the challenge. He is the right leader for this moment.”

By Sunday, it appeared Bon Jovi’s plea worked: Booker’s campaign announced that it had hit its fundraising threshold to participate in November’s Democratic primary debate.

WikiMedia Commons

Our Stuff.

Our Stuff.
Associate Editor Sarah Anne Hughes
 chatted with CNN anchor Van Joneswho’s become an outspoken voice for probation reform.

Washington Bureau Chief Robin Bravender explains how four of Pennsylvania’s newest members of Congress got to ‘Yes’ on impeachment.

Our partners at the Philadelphia Tribune crunched some Census data, and found that fewer African-Americans in Philadelphia are living in poverty.

On our Commentary Page, Opinion regular Dick Polman marvels at the Republicans’ steadfastness around President Donald Trump. And a University of Wisconsin/Madison scholar explains why private prisons are such a lightning rod for controversy.

The Philadelphia Skyline from the ‘Rocky Steps’ at the Philly Art Museum. Photo by Steve Lange, courtesy of Flickr Commons.

Elsewhere.
staggering $29.6B worth of Philly real estate is tax exempt. Is it time for nonprofits to start paying? The Inquirer considers the question.
Allegheny County doesn’t keep track of the ‘exact’ hours of cops pulling administrative duty, the Post-Gazette reports.
PennLive profiles Second Lady Gisele Fetterman, a ‘loud, proud’ advocate.
The Morning Call’s Peter Hall looks at the fallout for some Lehigh Valley whistleblowers, and what their experiences might portend for the future of the individual at the center of the big one in Washington D.C. right now.

Here’s your #Harrisburg Instagram of the Day:

During an appearance on MSNBC on Sunday, U.S. Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-4th District, told host Joy Reid that the country is in ‘such grave waters’ with the unfolding impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.

Philadelphia held its 57th Puerto Rican Day Parade, where participants paid tribute to the island’s indigenous history. WHYY-FM has the story.
With the fall high holy days of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur upon us, security at Pittsburgh-area synagogues is going to be tight this yearWESA-FM reports.
PoliticsPA has last week’s winners and losers in state government.
Schools are expanding their vegan lunch offerings, despite opposition from the meat industry, Stateline.org reports.
Internal D-Trip polling shows half of voters support impeaching the president, Roll Call reports.

What Goes On.
The House Democratic Policy Committee legs it to lovely Doylestown, Pa., where it holds a 2 p..m. public hearing at the historic Aldie Mansion on … erm … historical things …

What Goes On (Nakedly Political Edition).
7:30 a.m.:
 Golf outing for Sen. Tim Kearney
8 a.m.:
 Clay shoot for U.S. Rep. Scott Perry
If you were somehow able to be in two places at once, attended both events, and gave at the max, you’d be out a truly preposterous $15,000 today.

You Say It’s Your Birthday Dept.
Have a birthday you’d like celebrated for yourself or someone else in this space? Email at [email protected]and we’ll get you on the schedule.

Heavy Rotation.
Here’s an old favorite from The Bluetones, it’s ‘Slight Return.’

Monday’s Gratuitous Hockey Link.
The 2019-20 NHL season gets underway on Wednesday. Here’s a look at the Top 10 players in the league heading into this year’s campaign.

And now you’re up to date.

An award-winning political journalist with more than 25 years' experience in the news business, John L. Micek is The Pennsylvania Capital-Star's Editor-in-Chief. Before joining The Capital-Star, Micek spent six years as Opinion Editor at PennLive/The Patriot-News in Harrisburg, Pa., where he helped shape and lead a multiple-award-winning Opinion section for one of Pennsylvania's most-visited news websites. Prior to that, he spent 13 years covering Pennsylvania government and politics for The Morning Call of Allentown, Pa. His career has also included stints covering Congress, Chicago City Hall and more municipal meetings than he could ever count, Micek contributes regular analysis and commentary to a host of broadcast outlets, including CTV-News in Canada and talkRadio in London, U.K., as well as "Face the State" on CBS-21 in Harrisburg, Pa.; "Pennsylvania Newsmakers" on WGAL-8 in Lancaster, Pa., and the Pennsylvania Cable Network. His weekly column on American politics is syndicated nationwide to more than 800 newspapers by Cagle Syndicate.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here