Philadelphia students walk out for abortion rights

‘It’s very cool …They’re not putting up with it anymore,’ an onlooker said

By: - May 28, 2022 6:48 am
Local students and supporters taking part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, PA on 5/26/22 (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star).

Local students and supporters taking part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, PA on 5/26/22 (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star).

PHILADELPHIA —  Area high school students left class this week to take part in a national call to walk out for abortion rights by Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights.

They walked out on Thursday as part of a national call to “shut the country down” in response to the leaked Supreme Court documents suggesting the court would overturn both Roe V. Wade, the 1973 decision that provided a constitutional right to abortion, and Planned Parenthood V. Casey, which codified that right.

Supporters, who walked out of their jobs, joined the students meeting at Love Park, where the local Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights chapter held a brief rally before they all marched through the city’s streets.

S.C.H. Academy student Jojo's markered hands read "pro choice" as they took part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22. (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star)
S.C.H. Academy student Jojo’s markered hands read “pro choice” as they took part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22. (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star)

Students and supporters went around handing out stickers and flyers as well as collecting donations from anyone that would spare it. Along the way, the group would periodically stop and listen as a different marcher spoke.

Many gave incredibly personal speeches often moving others to tears before collectively chanting and cheering each other on.

Nyla, on left from CAPA high school, tying a green bandana around Girl’s High student, Brielle’s wrist during the national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22 (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star).

Olivia, one student that spoke in front of the marchers, said they were marching for their nine-year-old self. The student then went on to tell the group how they were assaulted at that age “multiple times by multiple people” and that “what the government doesn’t understand is that it is not just women that are facing this cause, it’s little girls and anyone with uteruses.”

Local students and supporters taking part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22. (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star)
Local students and supporters taking part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22.
(Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star)

Sadly, Olivia was not alone, as other students and supporters spoke of their assaults, some leading to abortions or miscarriages. 

The marchers continued on through the streets before stopping again outside of Jefferson Hospital.

Two students hugged after sharing their stories and why they felt abortion access should remain legal and safe during the national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22. (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star).

Upon seeing the students, Kaitlin Convery, who identified herself as a mix chemotherapist, said “it’s very cool because, you know what it is, I’m a millennial. I think we kind of started it, but Gen Z is really taking off in such a way that is incredible to see. Because a lot of these kids, they’re not taking it, sitting back, they’re not putting up with it anymore. I feel like we kind of got the ball rolling, Gen X might say they got the ball rolling, but I think we did and Gen Z is out here making these changes.”

Local students and supporters taking part in a national walk-out for abortion rights in Philadelphia, Pa. on 5/26/22 (Photo by Daniella Heminghaus, for the Capital-Star)

For a number of the students, it was their first march. Some also spoke about how they felt the government would not protect them.

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