Letting Pa. join regional greenhouse gas compact makes economic and environmental sense | Opinion

We’re one step closer toward meaningfully addressing climate change in the Commonwealth – but we have a long way to go.

Pa. environmental board approves plan to limit carbon from power plants; Wolf admin sets...

The Environmental Quality Board voted 13-6 Tuesday to let Pennsylvania enter the multi-state Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

We shouldn’t have to choose between a clean environment and more jobs. We can...

We need real dialogue that understands energy jobs and environmental concerns are not mutually exclusive. It's not an either/or proposition.

COVID-19 is a wake-up call: It’s high time for action on our climate crisis...

We are at a crossroads. Let’s put people’s health and safety first, and get ahead of the next crisis while responding to this one.

Pa.’s building trade unions need to be allies, not opponents, of a cleaner climate...

Union leaders understandably want to protect jobs, But Democratic legislators must resist this union pressure and vote with a broader societal focus.

Grand jury report on fracking should be a catalyst for change. This is why...

Read the report. And then ask yourself this simple question: would you let your family live in a community with fracking?

To build an energy efficient economy, Pa. needs to join regional greenhouse gas compact...

At a time when state budgets are crunched, $300 million from RGGI proceeds could provide a critical infusion into the economy.

We must confront the short and long-term threats of methane emissions. This is how...

There’s a strong business case for methane mitigation technologies, because wasted methane is wasted product companies could sell.

Joining RGGI will help Pa.’s economy grow smarter — and healthier | Opinion

By joining RGGI, the Commonwealth would be taking steps to ensure that all Pennsylvanians reap the benefits of a clean economy.

Bracing for the impact of climate change, local governments look to state for help

Working with the state Department of Environmental Protection, local municipalities such as 13,500-person Indiana Borough , are putting plans in place to protect their communities from climate-related changes and disasters.